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Larry J Suva

Department Head

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Phone: (979) 845-7261

Department: VTPP

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Research Interests

My entire research focus is on the skeletal consequences of disease. These interest include breast cancer bone metastasis and multiple myeloma, new chemotherapy approaches for osteosarcoma as well as fracture healing, bone anabolism and bone infections. Current research efforts include a focus on in vivo models (murine and larger animals) to discover regulatory pathways important for bone physiology, the development of rare bone disease pre-clinical model(s) involving larger animal species that have the potential to change the study of bone turnover as well as bone physiology, and provide novel insight into future therapeutic directions. Complete List of peer-reviewed Published Work can be found at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=suva+L

Education

  • Ph.D. Medicine, University of Melbourne, Australia 1989
  • B. App. Sci. Chemistry/Biochemistry, Swinburne Institute of Technology 1981

Scholarly Interests

The development and control of the musculoskeletal system has been my scholarly interest for the past 30+ years. The understanding of how the musculoskeletal system adapts and progresses throughout life is the basis of my physiology expertise. A critical aspect of my teaching philosophy is an open door policy and the importance of one-on-one interactions. Faculty need to ensure that we continue to provide training and exposure for our students as they prepare for careers both in and out of traditional biomedical research. I emphatically believe that these teaching and mentoring experiences have shaped my scientific career and have helped mold my teaching and mentoring philosophy that places the best academic, social and personal interest of students above all else. I am greatly looking forward to these interactions with the CVM students at TAMU. My laboratory is interested in studying how the musculoskeletal system adapts and deteriorates and what treatments can be given in order to prevent the loss of bone associated with aging and injury in in many mammals. I am an currently honored to be Professor and Department head of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology at Texas A&M University.



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