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ARRs Currently Available for Faculty Use

Contact lead author for further details and wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu for copy of the ARR.

DISCLAIMER: These papers are adaptations of original published peer-reviewed publications and reflect the adapting author's interpretation of the original. The adaptation should not be regarded as complete, nor necessarily accurate in all detail. This adaptation should be used only for educational purposes in accordance with "fair use" provisions of U.S. copyright law.

Theme Topic:

CANCER, AFLATOXIN

Key words (course relevant): toxicology, biomedicine, plants

Hook to interest students: Africans eat dirt to protect against moldy corn ... a modern alternative is tested in a clinical trial

Special content features: chemical adsorption, column chromatography, clinical trial design, crop storage/handling,

Summary Description of ARR: This is a clinical trial report that tests an adsorbent that can be taken as a pill to reduce the absorption of cancer-producing toxins in a mold that grows on grain and other foodstuffs

Original citation: NovaSil clay intervention in Ghanaians at high risk for aflatoxicosis: II. Reduction in biomarkers of aflatoxin exposure in blood and urine. Food Additives and Contaminants 25(5):622-34

Submitting Professor and Address: Tim Phillips, VIBS, tphillips@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

LEARNING AND MEMORY

Key words (course relevant): psychology, neuroscience, education

Hook to interest students: Color coding of instructional material can make it easier to remember.

Special content features: Test scores improve when instruction is color coded

Summary Description of ARR: Color coding of anatomical drawings made them easier to learn and remember.

Original citation: Lamberski, R. J., and Dwyer, F. M. (1983). The instructional effect of coding (color and black and white) on information acquisition and retrieval. ECTJ. 31 (1): 9-21.

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

LEARNING AND MEMORY

Key words (course relevant): psychology, neuroscience, education

Hook to interest students: Google is the enemy of remembering

Special content features: Stroop test, experimental design, memory processes

Summary Description of ARR: Four experiments indicated that when faced with difficult questions, people are primed to look to computers for the solutions. If they know the information will be needed in the future and they will have a need for it then, they are less likely to remember the information, but they will have better recall of where they can find it.

Original citation: Sparrow, B., Liu, J., and Wegner, D. M. (2012) Google effects on memory: cognitive consequences of having information at our fingertips. Science. 333: 776-778

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

LEARNING AND MEMORY

Key words (course relevant): psychology, neuroscience, education

Hook to interest students: How to correct false knowledge

Special content features: Applications for teaching, memory processes

Summary Description of ARR: The more confident one is about a misconception, the easier it is for proper feedback to correct it. Here, they tested the hypothesis that this "hypercorrection effect" can be demonstrated after a one-week delay after a misconception was initially corrected.

Original citation: Butler, A. C., Fazio, L. K.,and Marsh, E. J. (2011). The hypercorrection effect persists over a week, but high-confidence errors return. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. 10.3758/s13423-011-0173-y

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

LEARNING AND MEMORY

Key words (course relevant): psychology, neuroscience, education

Hook to interest students: Note taking strategies and their effectiveness

Special content features: ANOVA, memory processes, experimental design

Summary Description of ARR: Comparison of three note-taking conditions: encoding only (take notes/no review), encoding plus storage (take notes/review), and external storage only (borrow notes/review). Results indicated that best recall occurred in the condition of encoding plus storage. Performance on ability to synthesize information was superior for external storage compared with encoding. In a comparison the various methods of note-taking technique, a matrix approach was more effective than conventional note-taking approaches.

Original citation: Kiewra, K. A. et al. (1991). Note-taking functions and techniques. J. Educational Psychology. 83 (2): 240-245

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

LEARNING AND MEMORY, TEST ANXIETY

Key words (course relevant): education, learning and memory, emotion

Hook to interest students: Worry about tests? This paper may suggest a remedy.

Special content features: technique for reducing test anxiety and improving scores

Summary Description of ARR: Test of a way to reduce test anxiety based on writing about one's feelings

Original citation: Ramirez, G., and Beilock, S. L. 2011. Writing about testing worries boosts exam performance in the classroom. Science. 331:211-213.

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

LEARNING AND MEMORY, STUDY STRATEGIES

Key words (course relevant): psychology, neuroscience, education

Hook to interest students: Self-testing is important

Special content features: self-awareness/study strategies

Summary Description of ARR: Results indicated a correlation between GPA and 1) re-reading, 2) self-testing, and 3) scheduling of study time. Low performers were more likely to study late at night and compress their learning time rather than spreading it out and less likely to self-test and re-read.

Original citation: Hartwig, M. K. (2011). Study strategies of college students: Are self-testing and scheduling related to achievement? Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. 10.3758/s13423-011-0181-y

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

LEARNING AND MEMORY, EPIGENETICS

Key words (course relevant): psychology, neuroscience, education

Hook to interest students: The more you know, the more you CAN know.

Special content features: epigenetics,

Summary Description of ARR: Study of an animal model of the process by which new learning contributes to development of a more general schema. The consolidation of new learning occurred rapidly and was associated with rapid up-regulation of "early genes" in the prelimbic cortex. Drug treatments that targeted this area could prevent both new learning and the recall of previously consolidated information.

Original citation: Tse, D. et al. (2011). Schema-dependent gene activation and memory encoding in neocortex. Science. 333: 891-895.

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

NEUROLOGY, CONCUSSION

Key words (course relevant): sports medicine, physiology, behavior, neurology, neuroscience

Hook to interest students: When athletes get a little woozy from being hit hard, how do you know if they have a concussion?

Special content features: neurological examination

Summary Description of ARR: This study used a simple, 2-minute sideline test for concussion that could be used for quick decisions to pull an athlete from a contest.

Original citation: K. M. et al. 2011. The King-Devick tests as a determinant of head trauma and concussion in boxers and MMA fighters. Neurology, 76: 1456-1461.

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

NEUROLOGY, CONCUSSION

Key words (course relevant): sports medicine, physiology, behavior, neurology, neuroscience

Hook to interest students: What blows to the head do to your neurons.

Special content features: cell-cell adhesion

Summary Description of ARR: The hypothesis of this study was that a key part of the response to concussion could be protein "integrins" that help neurons stick to each other. These methods revealed that local damage depended on membrane integrins. Damage could be reduced by treating the neurons with a drug that that helps make intracellular structural proteins more stable.

Original citation: Hemphill, M. A. et al. 2011. A Possible Role for Integrin Signaling in Diffuse Axonal Injury. PLoS One. 6 (&) e22899. Retrieved from http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0022899

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS

Key words (course relevant): physiology, psychology, neuroscience

Hook to interest students: Teaching animals to cooperate, to volunteer for injection

Special content features: operant conditioning, adrenal stress response

Summary Description of ARR: Technique for reducing the stress in animals from invasive tissue sampling.

Original citation: Lambeth, S. P. et al. 2006. Positive reinforcement training affects hematologic and serum chemistry values in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodyes). Amer. J. Primatology. 68: 245-256

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

SLEEP AND WAKEFULNESS

Key words (course relevant): movement control, animal hypnosis, electroencephalography, animal behavior, psychology, physiology, neuroscience

Hook to interest students: Are hypnotized animals asleep? What is going on in their brain

Special content features: electronencephalography

Summary Description of ARR: Study of animal hypnosis to see if they show brain-wave signs of sleep

Original citation: Klemm, W. R. Electroencephalographic-behavioral dissociations during animal hypnosis. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology. 21: 365-372.

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

SLEEP, LEARNING AND MEMORY

Key words (course relevant): psychology, neuroscience, education

Special content features: neurotransmitters, drugs, memory processes

Summary Description of ARR: Events are consolidated into memory during sleep and sleep loss interferes with this process. Here, they tested whether or not sleep loss could contribute to false memories. Results showed that false memories were more common at retrieval after sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning increased false memories of theme words. The effect could be abolished by administration of caffeine just prior to retrieval. Since caffeine inhibits adenosine in the brain, and adenosine is a neurotransmitter, the false memory is attributed to impaired function of this neurotransmitter system.

Original citation: Diekelmann, S. et al. (2008). Sleep loss produces false memories. PLOS One. 3 (10): e3512. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0003512

Submitting Professor and Address: W. R. Klemm, VIBS, wklemm@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

VIRAL ENCEPHALOMYELITIS

Key words (course relevant): immunology,T cells, B cells, myelin, demyelination

Hook to interest students: How do viruses cause autoimmunity and neurological disease

Summary Description of ARR: This is an animal model study of the pathogenesis of a viral infection that causes encephalomyelitis resembling polio and multile sclerosis. The emphasis is on elucidating the role of the immune system.

Original citation: Welsh, C.J.R., Tonks, P., Nash, A.A. and Blakemore, W.F. (1987) The effect of L3T4 T cell depletion on the pathogenesis of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus infection in CBA mice. J. gen. Virol., 68, 1659-1667.

Submitting Professor and Address: Jane Welsh jwelsh@cvm.tamu.edu


Theme Topic:

Key words (course relevant):

Hook to interest students:

Summary Description of ARR:

Original citation:

Submitting Professor and Address: