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Lab Personnel

Principal Investigator

Annie Newell-Fugate

Annie Newell-Fugate

Assistant Professor (Principal Investigator)

I am a comparative endocrinologist specializing in the relationship between environmental influences (obesity, stress, toxicants) and fertility. My research assesses the direct effects of environmental factors on the interaction of metabolism, steroidogenesis, and fertility. Given the on-going epidemic of obesity and the increasing environmental exposure of humans and animals to a myriad of chemicals, it is critical to assess the impact of these environmental factors on normal physiology and to develop strategies to mitigate their pathologic consquences.

  • Post-doc, Reproductive Endocrinology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 2014
  • Ph.D., Reproductive Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2012
  • M.S., Wildlife Reproduction, University of Pretoria, South Africa, 2008
  • D.V.M., North Carolina State University, 2004
  • B.S., Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2000

Dr. Newell-Fugate's full Profile & CV

Graduate Students

Camille Goblet

Camille Goblet

MS Student (Biomedical Sciences with Physiology Focus)
cgoblet@cvm.tamu.edu

Dissertation: Reproductive endocrinology and pathology of non-domestic suidae and tassysuidae species

Undergraduate Students

Jacquelyn Askew

Jacquelyn Askew

Undergraduate Research Assistant (Biomedical Engineering)
jaskew@tamu.edu

Jackie Babin

Jackie Babin

Undergraduate Research Assistant (Animal Sciences/Microbiology)
jacqueline.babin@tamu.edu

Luke Browning

CIMPIR Undergraduate Student Researcher (Biomedical Sciences)
lukebrowning2014@tamu.edu

Project: Effects of androgens on insulin signaling in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue from lean female pigs

April Martinez

April Martinez

CIMPIR Undergraduate Student Researcher (Biomedical Sciences)
aprmar11@tamu.edu

Project: Effects of androgens on insulin signaling in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue from male and female rats