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The Student Perspectives blog is a fresh and realistic snapshot of the life of veterinary medical and biomedical science students.
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The Large Animal Medicine Twelve Days of Christmas

The Large Animal Medicine Twelve Days of Christmas

The semester's finally drawing to a close, but there's a few pesky exams standing in between us and a long-awaited break.  Tonight's objective: the final review (ok, let's be honest - last minute cramming) for tomorrow's large animal medicine final.

We've spent the past semester covering topics ranging from neurology, to lameness, respiratory disease, dentistry, gastrointestinal disease, ophthalmology, dermatology, and more… all neatly summarized into the four-inch-thick stack of notes in front of me.   You know the 'Twas the night before Christmas' poem, where the children fell asleep dreaming of sugarplums and St. Nick?  Last night's dreams involved Ortolani signs and the pros and cons of various fracture repair options.  Not that I'm complaining - I honestly wouldn't have it any other way.  Some of the best memories I'll take from vet school will be the late-night caffeine-fueled study sessions and crazy mnemonics my friends and I have come up with to remember everything from cranial nerves to small ruminant parasites.

So, in keeping with the Christmas music currently playing on my computer… and by way of review for our test tomorrow morning… here's the 12 Days of Christmas, large animal style.  See how many you can figure out!

12 - cranial nerves

11 - major foreign animal diseases

10 - more hours 'til the exam

9 - professors on the exam

8 - major quadrants in the Triadan numbering system

7 - reasons calves won't suckle

6 - types of equine sarcoids

5 - grades of lameness

4 - more days of classes

3 - joint pouches of the stifle

2 - major causes of equine pruritus

1 - large animal medicine exam!

Here's wishing you and yours a great holiday season!



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