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Student Perspectives
The Student Perspectives blog is a fresh and realistic snapshot of the life of veterinary medical and biomedical science students.
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Monthly Archives: September 2010

Oh Exams...

Oh Exams... It's hard to believe that we've been in school for a month already! We third years are currently finishing up our first set of exams. Over the summer, I forgot how much sleep you lose and how much caffeine you drink when you're preparing for vet school tests. We finished our Radiology and Large Animal Internal Medicine exams, and now we have Small Animal Internal Medicine looming at the start of this week. In fact, I'm typing this during a much needed study break! Even though our exams are actually well-spaced this time around, planning study time has been a challenge. There have been so many extra assignments that have needed attention: surgery reports, nutrition homework, clinical correlates cases. Juggling these numerous things while studying for multiple large, complex exams would put a little stress on anyone. At least I have 130 other people in my class that are feeling the exact same way! I feel like the only way to keep sanity with su... (Read More)

Third Year Begins...

Third Year Begins... It's a new year and classes are getting really exciting.  As a third year student, I finally get to choose my elective courses and spend time in both the small and large animal hospitals.  I recently spent the day in small animal surgery, where I watched a fourth year student perform a cat spay (under the watchful eye of one of the small animal surgeons).  It feels both strange and exciting to know that that will be me a year from now!  During the surgery, another third year student and I were grilled on the pharmacology and surgery prep that was going on.  I had to quickly recall information from last year to answer questions about opioids, analgesics, induction drugs and inhalant anesthetics, as well as sterile surgical preparation. Once the surgery was finished, we grabbed a quick lunch and then learned how to operate a surgical laser.  We practiced holding and moving the stylet by writing our names on a wet pops... (Read More)

Small Animal Internal Medicine

Small Animal Internal Medicine Clinics. Here at A&M, the third year of vet school is where we get our first "official" view of the small and large animal hospitals.  We're on 4-week rotational blocks, four blocks per semester, and in one of those blocks per semester we'll spend one day of the week on the clinical floor.  So, for this current block I've been spending my Wednesdays in the hospitals - observing, helping, trying to learn as much as possible, and having a lot of fun in the process. Last week, I was on Small Animal Internal Medicine.  The service had very few patients in the hospital this morning, so after the fourth year students were done with their morning treatments we met back in the rounds room with our lead clinician.  It was quiz time.  Dr. Zoran put up two imaginary cases on the whiteboard - two cats, one who had suddenly presented for panting, one with a two-week history of coughing, and gave us 20 minutes to come up with ... (Read More)

And the new year begins

And the new year begins Howdy! Third year has started off great so far. It is going to definitely be a drastic change from the first two years of veterinary school. First and second year consisted of a set curriculum of mostly lecture. During third year, we get the opportunity to select our own elective classes, begin a few days of clinical rotations, and perform surgery. Yesterday, I was anesthetist for my first surgery of the year. It was exciting and absolutely nerve-wracking all at the same time. Being in charge of monitoring and maintaining the life of an animal while surgery is being performed is a huge responsibility.  Surgery requires an enormous amount of preparation, but when you are in the operating room, your patient is under anesthesia, and the surgeon makes the first incision. You are glad that you are prepared. It is important not only to know how to use the equipment and surgical instruments, what to expect during surgery, but also how to respo... (Read More)