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Student Perspectives
The Student Perspectives blog is a fresh and realistic snapshot of the life of veterinary medical and biomedical science students.
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Marilyn

Photo of MarilynMarilyn is a second-year veterinary student who plans to pursue a mixed animal practice with an emphasis on equine medicine. She is originally from the Dallas-Ft. Worth area and attended Texas A&M University for her undergraduate education. In 2006 she earned a Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Science with minors in chemistry and business. Marilyn graduated with several honors distinctions including University Scholar, Foundation Scholar, and Honors Fellows Thesis Scholar.

Between undergraduate work and veterinary school, Marilyn spent time working and traveling the country. She resided for several years in New York City where she worked in finance as a junior trader at a hedge fund. She also operated a boutique in-home pet sitting business in Flower Mound, Texas.

Marilyn has an extensive background of philanthropy. She has severed on the board of directors of numerous charities, including Impact Animal Foundation (formerly Woodstock Animal Foundation of Texas), GALLOP NYC, and Flower Mound Furry Friends Rescue. She has also served as fundraising director and executive director for charitable organizations.

Outside of class, Marilyn enjoys riding horses, traveling, running, hiking, biking, and spending time with friends and family. Marilyn is a passionate horsewoman and has ridden horses since childhood. She has trained and competed in Hunters, Jumpers, Dressage, and Endurance racing. She is also a PATH-certified therapeutic horseback riding instructor. She currently owns an Arabian mare that is in training for endurance racing and two adorable Chihuahuas.

Marilyn initially was interested in both human and veterinary medicine. She spent time shadowing at both types of practices and found things she loved about each type of medicine. What solidified her decision to pursue veterinary medicine is that it offers the unique ability to help and enrich the lives of both humans and animals.

Marilyn’s vet school survival tip: Form study groups with people you get along with. DVM students spend most of their time either in class or studying, so it’s critical to surround yourself with people who can help you to remember to have a little fun, even when school becomes challenging or stressful.