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Student Perspectives
The Student Perspectives blog is a fresh and realistic snapshot of the life of veterinary medical and biomedical science students.
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Archive for tag: labs

Terra, the 'Service Dog'

Terra, the 'Service Dog' Recently, I was able to bring my dog, Terra, to school! That is one of the perks of being a veterinary student—sometimes we get to all bring our pets to class. Mikaela and Terra We needed her for our orthopedics laboratory, in which we were learning to do a proper orthopedic exam and how to apply a splint. Nothing beats the real thing when it comes to practicing, and Terra was a willing patient (for a lot of treats). We started out by just watching her walk in a straight line from the front, back, and sides to see her gait and how she moves. This can help you identify if there is a lame leg and which one it could be. Then you do the same thing at a jog. After that, we do a standing exam and you feel over all the joints for anything that is out of the ordinary. It is important to feel both sides at the same time to compare the two sides. Following the standing exam, Terra got to lay down and we went through all the ranges of motion on each joint to make s... (Read More)

A Glimpse into the Vet School Curriculum

A Glimpse into the Vet School Curriculum As the new curriculum is implemented here at Texas A&M's College of Veterinary Medicine, more and more courses are designed to be fully clinically relevant. For the students, this means we get to play doctor from day one, as overwhelming as that may be. Here are some examples of what my fellow second-year veterinary students and I have seen among some of our classes this semester. “Charlie is a 6-year-old MC Boston Terrier who presented to your clinic with a one-month history of seizures that have been increasing in frequency and duration. After reviewing the following complete history and introductory blood work, write a prescription for an appropriate drug for Charlie.” Thus begins another pharmacology lab. My classmates are split into groups of five or so, each with a different case profile. For this lab, the groups are paired, with one acting as the emergency service and the other as the neurologists. While every case is differe... (Read More)

Learning through Labs

Learning through Labs After the gauntlet of the first two years of veterinary school, it really is nice to experience some of the perks of third year. We get to put a lot of what we learned our first two years of school into use, especially during our lab periods. Just this past week, our Small Animal Medicine class had us practicing a procedure called a pericardiocentesis, a procedure that involves inserting a needle through the body wall and into the pericardium, the sac that surrounds the heart, so that the fluid can be drained. This may be necessary in certain patients to remove excess fluid to make them feel better and also so that the fluid can be tested to determine what may be causing the patient’s problem. My class was able to practice this on some pretty cool models that simulate how it will feel to perform the procedure in a live patient one day. We previously had several large-animal labs. My favorite was the ophthalmology lab, which gave us practice in ... (Read More)

Keeping Swimming via Wet Labs

Keeping Swimming via Wet Labs Time flies quickly—I feel that this is so true. One-third of the fall semester has already passed. When my day starts, usually at 6 a.m., it does not stop until midnight or as late as 2 a.m. As Dory, from the movie “Finding Nemo,” says, “Just keep swimming, swimming, swimming”...that’s each day for me. It seems tiring, but certainly not boring, because along the way I am learning many different aspects of medicine for different species. As a second-year veterinary student at Texas A&M, there is still a lot to learn until I become a veterinarian. With little clinical experiences prior to applying to the program, I felt like a deer in front of the headlights. But soon enough, I learned that opportunities are always around, not only in the clinical skill labs provided in school curriculum, but I can also easily get clinical experiences outside of the classroom. The more I practice my clinical skills, the more confident I will be when I g... (Read More)