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Student Perspectives
The Student Perspectives blog is a fresh and realistic snapshot of the life of veterinary medical and biomedical science students.
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Archive for tag: pathology

Looking Back and Ahead

Looking Back and Ahead Wow! This semester has just flown by! It seems like I just started classes again, but, instead, I just completed my finals. In my last block for the semester, I took two electives, "Clinical Pathology" and "Emergency Medicine." Clinical pathology is understanding disease processes and how they commonly present themselves using diagnostic tests such as blood work or cytology. Knowing how often veterinarians in practice read bloodwork, I was excited to be able to practice those skills and increase my confidence level before my fourth year. Emergency medicine was great because it helped me create a plan for the worst outcome, in hopes of saving lives. Having a basic idea of what to do in emergency situations helps give you a framework and the confidence to face those challenging cases head on. I have really enjoyed my electives this semester because I love how clinically relevant they are and how much they are preparing me for not only fourth year, but when I am o... (Read More)

A Glimpse into the Vet School Curriculum

A Glimpse into the Vet School Curriculum As the new curriculum is implemented here at Texas A&M's College of Veterinary Medicine, more and more courses are designed to be fully clinically relevant. For the students, this means we get to play doctor from day one, as overwhelming as that may be. Here are some examples of what my fellow second-year veterinary students and I have seen among some of our classes this semester. “Charlie is a 6-year-old MC Boston Terrier who presented to your clinic with a one-month history of seizures that have been increasing in frequency and duration. After reviewing the following complete history and introductory blood work, write a prescription for an appropriate drug for Charlie.” Thus begins another pharmacology lab. My classmates are split into groups of five or so, each with a different case profile. For this lab, the groups are paired, with one acting as the emergency service and the other as the neurologists. While every case is differe... (Read More)

One Semester Closer

One Semester Closer This week marks an always interesting and stressful time the in the life of a vet student - finals. During the fall semester of the second year of veterinary school we take the following classes: pharmacology, parasitology, nutrition (split into large and small animal), clinical correlates, and pathology. Lucky for me, we do not have to take a final in correlates, so I was down to four. My first test was nutrition. I tried to prepare myself as best I could for large animal nutrition. I filled my mind with information pertaining to things like rumen pH, forage and concentrate ratios, milk fever, and the proper amount of amino acids that should be in the diet. The more that I studied for this class; the more I realized that my interest does not lie in large animals. However, in order to be a well-rounded doctor it is still important that I have some idea as to what these terms mean. My second final was pathology. Our teacher took it easy on us this ... (Read More)